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This short clip, produced for the Sana'a Basin Water Management Project (SBWMP) & National Water Resource Authority - Sana'a Basin (NWRA-SB), shows the urgent need to implement Integrated Water Resource Management in the Sana'a basin.  More info: IWRM group on Facebook Produced by: IWRM group. Idea and scenario by Eng. Abdulkhaleq Alwan. Sound by Mr. Saleem Alramah. Coordination by Eng. Saad Alhawsali Montaj. Editing by Mr. Adnan Almatari. Year: 2010 Language: Arabic »»

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Welcome to TheWaterChannel, home to hundreds of videos and dossiers on key water themes! The latest dossier is ‘Water Stories from the Arab Region.’ Watch videos, webinars, news and blogs.... and share your own!

 

Fuel shortage driving Yemen to the brink

In an open letter published in The Times on May 9, a UK-based group of diplomats, academicians and aid workers has made an urgent plea to ensure a lasting ceasefire and safe passage of fuel to Yemeni towns and villages. Fuel is a particularly key component in this conflict, propping up the economy and the day-to-day in the water-scarce nation.  Agriculture depends critically on diesel-powered pumps. Fuel is also key to fishermen along its long coastline, industries and their supply chains.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Webinar: Rainfed Agriculture and Flood Based Farming

Flood Based Farming systems cover a wide array of resource systems that depend on temporarily floods in particular, such as spate irrigation and inundation canals. The aim of the Flood Wells project was to increase the productivity of the marginally used floodplains by introducing flood wells.


 





 




Water-Smart Agriculture in East Africa

Ugandan Science Journalist William Odinga travels back to Otuke in Northern Uganda to find out what changes have occurred in the rural farming communities that struggle to subsist in variable climate where rainfall is unpredictable. 


Webinar: Retention and Recharge at Basin Level 

How can constructed Wetlands delay drainage, retain, infiltrate and purify water? How can 3R (Recharge, Retention, Reuse) mechanisms be used taking the landscape and environment into account?


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mainstreaming gender equality in the water sector

In the Arab region, many women represent the largest group of beneficiaries of improved water services and direct users of water, says Atef Hamdey, Emeritus Professor, Water Resource Management (2009). They also safeguard their water resources, and thus do much of the water management. However, the role of women to have a voice in water management draws little attention.















No Water, No Caliphate 

The last couple of months the news has been overflowing with horrible and shocking images of Islamic State (IS) warriors driving the local people out of their houses, beheading Western journalists and breaking-down ancient artifacts of the region. Less is spoken about the influence of IS on water in the area they have occupied. How catastrophic is this self-proclaimed caliphate for the availability of this life sustaining resource in the Middle East? 


Eye on the Dry

Situated in the far East of Sudan, the Gash Die is where the 'wild' Gash River comes to a stop in desert territory. With only 100 milimetres of rainfall and blazing heat it has always been a harsh place, but it has seen better times. Livestock population changed, invasive vegetation took over the ecosystem and water supply became more tenuous. Huge water storage tanks and their management and protection are of great importance. This WaterBlog reminds us to always keep an 'eye on the dry'


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weeping Stones, Filling Wells

The people from Afar (Ethiopia) harvest steam from underground streams passing through burning volcanic rocks. These ‪steamwells‬ are crucial for their survival. Afar is a region of utmost aridity. With an average annual rainfall of 100 to 300 mm, it has the ignoble reputation of being one of the hottest places on Earth.








 



Eery Beauty and Deadly Rains

Two times deadly rains troubled the area that is now Lake Hashenge in Ethiopia. First, according to the tale, it was Mother Mary who flooded the area because of the lack of compassion by the people of the village. Ages later, the deadly rains came from the invading Italian army in the form of planes spraying water mixed with sulphur mustard.